Explanation Of A Compounding Pharmacy VIDEO

Charles Bonner is the lead Pharmacist for Stevens Pharmacy

Charles Bonner Lead Pharmacist Stevens Pharmacy

According to Wikipedia, Compounding is “the process of mixing drugs by a pharmacist or physician to fit the unique needs of a patient. This may be done for medically necessary reasons, such as to change the form of the medication from a solid pill to a liquid, to avoid a non-essential ingredient that the patient is allergic to, or to obtain the exact dose needed. It may also be done for voluntary reasons, such as adding favorite flavors to a medication”

We are Stevens Pharmacy and compounding center. We are a world class compounding pharmacy located in Costa Mesa, California, in the heart of Orange County.

We produce custom compounded medications for the special needs of patients and physicians.

Customer satisfaction is our number 1 goal and our medications are used all over the world. Make sure and check out our many compounding pharmacy videos across the Net.

And of course, feel free to visit our website and we welcome your questions and business!

Charles Bonner
Lead Compounding Pharmacist
Stevens Compounding Pharmacy
Costa Mesa, CA

Posted in Adrenal Fatigue, bioidentical hormones, compounding pharmacy, cosmetic dentist, Dentists, fatigue, Hormone Replacement, low thyroid, Pharmacy, Profound Gel, Steven’s Pharmacy, Thyroid, video | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Compounding Pharmacy Expert Charles Bonner explains tests for low hormones VIDEO

Compounding Pharmacy lead pharmacist Charles Bonner of Stevens Pharmacy answers your questions

Compounding Pharmacy lead pharmacist Charles Bonner of Stevens Pharmacy answers your questions

Posted in Adrenal Fatigue, bioidentical hormones, compounding pharmacy, Diabetes, Hormone Replacement, low thyroid, Pharmacy, Steven’s Pharmacy, Testosterone, Thyroid, Thyroid Hormones | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Bioidentical Hormones, HRT, BHRT Explained By Charles Bonner of Stevens Pharmacy VIDEO

Compounding Pharmacy lead pharmacist Charles Bonner of Stevens Pharmacy answers your questions

Compounding Pharmacy lead pharmacist Charles Bonner of Stevens Pharmacy answers your questions

Charles Bonner, lead pharmacist at Stevens Pharmacy and Compounding Pharmacy Center, talks about bio-identical hormones. As usual, his response is clear, concise and easy to understand. Look for the Stevens Compounding Pharmacy videos all over the Internet.

The compounding pharmacist to the world looks forward to fielding more of your questions. Be sure and post any questions you would like Charles to answer for you.

Stevens Pharmacy and Compounding Pharmacy Center
Located in Costa Mesa in Orange County, California (The OC)
www.stevensrx.com

Posted in bioidentical hormones, Compound Medications, compounding pharmacy, Hormone Replacement, Pain Gels, Pharmacy, Steven’s Pharmacy, Topical Anesthetics | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Compounding Pharmacy Stevens Pharmacy Located From Outer Space VIDEO

Compounding Pharmacy lead pharmacist Charles Bonner of Stevens Pharmacy answers your questions

Compounding Pharmacy lead pharmacist Charles Bonner of Stevens Pharmacy answers your questions

One of our original tongue in cheek videos about locating us from outer space. 😉

For all of your compounding pharmacy needs, feel free to visit us at our website.

Stevens Pharmacy and Compounding Pharmacy Center
Located in Costa Mesa, Orange County, California
www.stevensrx.com

Our compounding pharmacy videos

Posted in Adrenal Fatigue, bioidentical hormones, compounding pharmacy, Dental, fatigue, Hormone Replacement, low thyroid, Pain Gels, Pharmacy, Steven’s Pharmacy, Thyroid Hormones | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Compounding Pharmacy Dental Gels VIDEO

Compounding Pharmacy lead pharmacist Charles Bonner of Stevens Pharmacy answers your questions

Compounding Pharmacy lead pharmacist Charles Bonner of Stevens Pharmacy answers your questions

Charles Bonner of Stevens Pharmacy talks about Profound and Profound Lite Dental Gels

Profound Dental gel is an topical anesthetic gel made from a powerful combination of tetracaine, lidocaine, and prilocaine. It actually allows for gingival (gum) recontouring and other soft tissue procedures with little or no need for local anesthesia.

If, after application of Profound Dental Gel, a patient were to be given local anesthesia via injection, the patient would experience no burn or sting. With our many years in the compounding pharmacy business, Profound Dental Gel, you can nearly eliminate the need for lower blocks and achieve instant pulpal (gum) anesthesia without any tongue or cheek numbness.

As a long time established compounding pharmacy, we also compound Profound Light dental gel, which is half the strength and provides good anesthesia for deep cleanings and other work the dental hygienist might do. Please visit our Stevens Compounding Pharmacy video selection and our website for more information about our various compounding pharmacy dental gels.

Stevens Pharmacy and Compounding Pharmacy Center
Located in Costa Mesa in Orange County, California (The OC)
www.stevensrx.com

Posted in Compound Medications, compounding pharmacy, Dentists, Pain Gels, Pharmacy, Steven’s Pharmacy, topical anesthetic gel | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Dentist and Dental Gels… Dyclone Cyclone Information

Compounding Pharmacy lead pharmacist Charles Bonner of Stevens Pharmacy answers your questions

Compounding Pharmacy lead pharmacist Charles Bonner of Stevens Pharmacy answers your questions

As a service to our ever growing dentist customer base, we are reprinting an article by Dr. Michael DiTolla called The Return of Dyclone!

The Return of Dyclone!
Michael DiTolla

Dr. Michael DiTolla talks about Stevens  Pharmacy custom compounded dental gels

Dr. Michael DiTolla talks about Stevens compounding Pharmacy custom compounded dental gels

“Every once in awhile a product just seems to disappear from the dental marketplace with little or no warning. Typically, it is difficult to even find information on why the product was discontinued, or if anyone else is making a similar product. I remember after graduating from dental school that I began using a temporary material called Scutan. I loved the handling characteristics of this material, and used it on every temporary. Then, one day, it was unavailable from any dental dealer. Our rep said the material was made from a certain tree, and that the raw material was no longer available. It sounded like a fishy explanation, but the bottom line was the material was gone.

Earlier this year, the long-lasting local anesthetic Marcaine disappeared suddenly. Since Duranest disappeared, Marcaine was essentially the only long-lasting local anesthetic available in carpules for dentistry. The Internet has made it easier to investigate these issues, and – when Kodak changed etidocaine suppliers – new FDA clearances had to be filed and approved before Marcaine could be sold again. Meanwhile, dentists were left without an anesthetic that could provide four to six hours of pulpal anesthesia. Thus, patients had to be reinjected on longer cases.

But the most complaints I have heard from hygienists deal with the disappearance of Dyclone. My hygienists mourned its loss, and I have received inquiries from hygienists around the country about what happened to it. Dyclone was a topical anesthetic in a liquid form that patients could swish with for one minute to anesthetize gingival and palatal tissues. It is fantastic for hygiene patients who need some anesthesia but don’t want local infiltrations or blocks. It also worked well for needle-phobic, sensitive hygiene patients, and for patients who gag during impressions. I searched the FDA database and found that the company decided to stop producing the product for its own reasons. The FDA verified that it had nothing to do with the safety or efficacy of the product.

During a chance conversation with an individual from a local compounding pharmacy, I was shocked to learn that the pharmacy compounded Dyclone, and has been doing so for years! This person said the pharmacy does the compounding for many medical professionals but not dentists. Needless to say, I ordered several bottles of the product. When I gave the bottles to my hygienists, they acted as if they were popping corks on champagne bottles!

The product is available from Steven’s Pharmacy at (800) 352-3784 or (714) 540-8911.The pharmacist I deal with at Steven’s is Charles Bonner. The pharmacy labels the solution Cyclone. It is available in the original strength that my practice once used, 0.5 percent. It also is available in a double-strength 1.0 percent solution called Cyclone DS. My practice has settled on Cyclone DS. We have noticed no difference between the two solutions except that Cyclone DS works better on most patients. Unlike the original Dyclone, which had an unpleasant taste, Cyclone is available in both tangerine and lime. These flavors make the product palatable for more patients.

We use Cyclone DS on patients who are worried about having impressions taken, whether for Invisalign, bleaching trays, or even just study models. We use it on full-arch crown and bridge impressions, as well as on patients who may gag while we try to capture the detail of multiple preps. We even use it prior to taking digital X-rays. On the hygiene side, we use it for periodontal probing for patients with inflammation, as well as gross-debridement patients who have sensitivity. We see many patients who are overdue for hygiene but do not need scaling and root planing. Since we typically only use local anesthetic for root planing patients, Cyclone helps fill the gap since it is an easy-to-use topical that helps to provide peace of mind for the patients.

We offer Cyclone to almost any patient receiving treatment who doesn’t get local anesthesia. My practice does not charge for this service, although there are dentists who have told me that they charge a small fee (typically $5), and that patients are happy to pay the fee. We also don’t charge for local anesthetic, and think that providing Cyclone falls into the same category.”

Dr. Michael DiTolla is the Director of Clinical Research and Education at Glidewell Laboratories in Newport Beach, Calif. He lectures nationwide on both restorative and cosmetic dentistry. Dr. DiTolla has several clinical programs available on DVD through Glidewell. For more information on this article, or to receive a free copy of one of Dr. DiTolla’s clinical DVDs, e-mail him at mcditolla@mac.com.

Our compounding pharmacy videos and a more recent compounding pharmacy video.

Posted in Compound Medications, compounding pharmacy, Dentists, Pain Gels, Pharmacy, Steven’s Pharmacy, topical anesthetic gel | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Bio-Identical Hormones verses Non-Bio-Identical Hormones

Compounding Pharmacy lead pharmacist Charles Bonner of Stevens Pharmacy answers your questions

Compounding Pharmacy lead pharmacist Charles Bonner of Stevens Pharmacy answers your questions


Bio-Identical verses Non-Bio-Identical Hormones

As a compounding pharmacy, we frequently hear many types of questions about bio-identical hormones. We hope the following explanation is helpful. For more information, feel free to visit the Stevens Pharmacy website.

Bio-identical hormones have the same chemical structure as hormones that are made by the human body. The term “bio-identical” does not indicate the source of the hormone, but rather refers to the chemical structure. In order for a replacement hormone to fully replicate the function of hormones which were originally naturally produced and present in the human body, the chemical structure must exactly match the original. Bio-identical hormones are able to follow normal metabolic pathways so that essential active metabolites are formed in response to hormone replacement therapy.

There are significant differences between hormones that are natural to humans (bio-identical) and non-bio-identical (including horse) preparations. Side chains can be added to a naturally-occurring hormone to create a synthetic drug that can be patented by a manufacturer. A patented drug can be profitable to mass produce, and therefore a drug company can afford to fund research as to the medication’s use and effectiveness. However, bio-identical substances can not be patented, so scientific studies are less numerous on natural hormones, because medical research is usually funded by drug companies. Structural differences that exist between bio-identical human, and non-bio-identical synthetic and animal hormones may be responsible for side effects that are experienced when non-bio-identical hormones are used for replacement therapy.

Bio-identical hormones include estrone (E1), estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), progesterone, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and pregnenolone. Our compounding specialists work together with patients and prescribers to provide customized bio-identical hormone replacement therapy that provides the needed hormones in the most appropriate strength and dosage form to meet each woman’s specific needs. Hormone replacement therapy should be initiated carefully after a woman’s medical and family history has been reviewed. Every woman is unique and will respond to therapy in her own way. Close monitoring and medication adjustments are essential.

More information is available here.

Our compounding pharmacy videos are hereand a newer compounding pharmacy video here as well.

Posted in bioidentical hormones, Compound Medications, compounding pharmacy, Estradiol, Estriol, Estrone, Hormone Assessment Quiz, Hormone Replacement, Hormones, Palliative, Patient, Prescription, Progesterone, Senior Care, Steven’s Pharmacy, Testosterone, testosterone creme | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment